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RENEE PETROPOULOS
Untitled (Mirror), 2009
Wood, mirrored plexiglass
10 x 22 x 11 in (25.4 x 55.88 x 27.94 cm)

This work was originally created for the exhibition “Homage”. In 2009, the sculpture/bench was situated near the front entrance to the exhibition where the sculpture mirrored the white wall of the gallery offering a moment of repose and contemplation. In 2011, the work was situated on a tiled floor below an open raw dark wood ceiling. The exhibition title was painting. design. speculation. generosity.

The bottom two are an installation view at the Church of he Epiphany

Benefit for The Church of the Epiphany, Los Angeles, curated by West of Rome Founder Emi Fontana and LACMA curator Rita Gonzalez. Epiphany is a birthplace of the Latino struggle for civil rights and is an architectural landmark. Proceeds will go towards restoration

ALEXANDRA GRANT
LOVE LOVE LOVE, 1, 2014 3 of 50 and
LOVE LOVE LOVE, 2, 2014 2 of 50
Letterpress on Shikishi Paper
11 x 9.5 in (27.94 x 24.13 cm)
Framed


Above are professional shots of the works along with a close instillation view by me.


Auction for the Epiphany Conservation Trust
West of Rome Founder and Director Emi Fontana and LACMA curator Rita Gonzalez

NANCY DWYER
Thinking Machine, 2012
Wood
9.5 x 18 x 5.5 in (24.13 x 45.72 x 13.97 cm) - Depth: 11 inches with rotating element
2 of 3 AP

Benefit for The Church of the Epiphany, Los Angeles, curated by West of Rome Founder Emi Fontana and LACMA curator Rita Gonzalez. Epiphany is a birthplace of the Latino struggle for civil rights and is an architectural landmark. Proceeds will go towards restoration.

JEFFREY VALLANCE
Vallance Bible (with marginalia), 2014
Micron archival ink on paper.
8.25 x 6.25 x 0.375 in (20.96 x 15.88 x 0.95 cm)
Unique

The Gospel according to Vallance was donated for auction to raise funds for the Epiphany Conservation Trust. The event aimed to help restore Church of the Epiphany, a prominent part of Los Angeles cultural history. The church was the Los Angeles base for Cesar Chavez’ United Farm Workers Movement. Also the local headquarters for presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy’s campaign.

For the occasion of the fundraiser Vallance performed at the church and had a reading from his bible. I really enjoyed this because I personally am captivated by things that deal with religion. I guess it’s the ex catholic in me. I also like that in some of his other works he has delved into archaeology, myth, and paranormal. The conversation at the church was really captivating and I actually wished that it could have gone on twice as long. Great night. And the auction curated by Emi Fontana and Rita Gonzalez had some other amazing works. I’ll post some of those as well.

You can read an interview with Vallance on making the bible here. There’s also a link to some video and audio there as well.

Louise Bourgeois

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

DAN ATTOE
Complicated Animals, 2008

DAN ATTOE
Complicated Animals, 2008

I have not seen work by this artist before, but I was drawn to it for the obvious vibrancy of the neon but also because of the subject theme…. we (humans) seem so divine in our ability to out-think other animals, but in fact they are far more divine in their grace and rank on this earth. 

I guess I liked everything about this work. So I had to share it.

DAN ATTOE
Complicated Animals, 2008

DAN ATTOE
Complicated Animals, 2008

I have not seen work by this artist before, but I was drawn to it for the obvious vibrancy of the neon but also because of the subject theme…. we (humans) seem so divine in our ability to out-think other animals, but in fact they are far more divine in their grace and rank on this earth.

I guess I liked everything about this work. So I had to share it.

5deadlydaisies:

When reading this I recalled part of a conversation I had with my best friend when we were at the now defunct L&M Arts in Los Angeles. I shared my original photos back in September of 2012

I decided to send my friend the following email about the thoughts the Holzer “Inflammatory Essay” brought up.

My exquisite friend, 

I find I am usually thinking of this thing or that, that I might tell you. Most of it is not really important in the scheme of things, just silly fluff that pops into my head that I’d probably share with you. 

So, I am just gonna write a bit of nonsense that has come to me. 

So I was looking at an “Inflammatory Essay” by Jenny Holzer, and thinking how well crafted the following line is. “Reach into the dark ages and find a sound that is liquid horror, a sound of the brink where man stops and the beast and nameless cruel forces begin”. The particular essay is on torture and how you should scream. The reason I thought of you (besides the quality of the writing), was the fact that I recalled something you said when we went to see the Holzer exhibit at L&M Gallery. She had those paintings with things about war, torture, rape or murder on them. Where many of the sentences were redacted like government documents.  You mentioned something about how that kind of thing doesn’t work for you artistically at all because the subject matter was so horrible and cruel. I am completely paraphrasing here, because I have no clue anymore what you actually said.  This was just the impression I was left with. We’ve had other conversations also where this has come up. I totally get what you mean even if this never has the same effect on me. 

First I must say that I am pretty sure I don’t feel some things as deeply as you do. I guess, like physical pain and many other things there must be an emotional spectrum where very sensitive people lay on one end and sociopaths lay on the other. Guess I’d be closer to a sociopath, LOL… ok not too close, but you know what I mean.  When I see things that reflect the dark parts of human nature, I tend to welcome it. Only on an intellectual level. I welcome it because it makes me think, it makes me grateful for my own fortune, and it reminds me that perhaps I could again at some point be helpful to those problems in some way. And for some reason I feel better if I keep these things in my thoughts. I feel like those who lived through them didn’t do so in vein, that any emotion generated on their behalf somehow serves them at least in honor of their memory. I know that may not make a whole lot of sense.  Since there is no light without dark, I think that art is well served by dealing with the difficult things in life just as well as the kind. On a less esoteric sense, I am very interested in human behavior and our psychology -and a lot of that is reflected in crime, hate and war. 

OK, that was out of no where I guess. Part of me thinks I should just keep this and not send it since I think I just wrote it for me. But I guess I’ll send it anyway. Since it was about and experience we shared together. 

Much love to you my goddess of light!
C.

PS may have to post this.

5deadlydaisies:

When reading this I recalled part of a conversation I had with my best friend when we were at the now defunct L&M Arts in Los Angeles. I shared my original photos back in September of 2012

I decided to send my friend the following email about the thoughts the Holzer “Inflammatory Essay” brought up.

My exquisite friend,

I find I am usually thinking of this thing or that, that I might tell you. Most of it is not really important in the scheme of things, just silly fluff that pops into my head that I’d probably share with you.

So, I am just gonna write a bit of nonsense that has come to me.

So I was looking at an “Inflammatory Essay” by Jenny Holzer, and thinking how well crafted the following line is. “Reach into the dark ages and find a sound that is liquid horror, a sound of the brink where man stops and the beast and nameless cruel forces begin”. The particular essay is on torture and how you should scream. The reason I thought of you (besides the quality of the writing), was the fact that I recalled something you said when we went to see the Holzer exhibit at L&M Gallery. She had those paintings with things about war, torture, rape or murder on them. Where many of the sentences were redacted like government documents. You mentioned something about how that kind of thing doesn’t work for you artistically at all because the subject matter was so horrible and cruel. I am completely paraphrasing here, because I have no clue anymore what you actually said. This was just the impression I was left with. We’ve had other conversations also where this has come up. I totally get what you mean even if this never has the same effect on me.

First I must say that I am pretty sure I don’t feel some things as deeply as you do. I guess, like physical pain and many other things there must be an emotional spectrum where very sensitive people lay on one end and sociopaths lay on the other. Guess I’d be closer to a sociopath, LOL… ok not too close, but you know what I mean. When I see things that reflect the dark parts of human nature, I tend to welcome it. Only on an intellectual level. I welcome it because it makes me think, it makes me grateful for my own fortune, and it reminds me that perhaps I could again at some point be helpful to those problems in some way. And for some reason I feel better if I keep these things in my thoughts. I feel like those who lived through them didn’t do so in vein, that any emotion generated on their behalf somehow serves them at least in honor of their memory. I know that may not make a whole lot of sense. Since there is no light without dark, I think that art is well served by dealing with the difficult things in life just as well as the kind. On a less esoteric sense, I am very interested in human behavior and our psychology -and a lot of that is reflected in crime, hate and war.

OK, that was out of no where I guess. Part of me thinks I should just keep this and not send it since I think I just wrote it for me. But I guess I’ll send it anyway. Since it was about and experience we shared together.

Much love to you my goddess of light!
C.

PS may have to post this.

Mike Kelley at MOCA

Kelley. at moca

Mike Kelley retrospective at MOCA

Mike Kelley, Memory Ware

poeticasvisuais:

Interior with mirrored wall, Roy Lichtenstein, 1991

poeticasvisuais:

Interior with mirrored wall, Roy Lichtenstein, 1991

(Source: aestheticgoddess)

Monica Bonvicini
Run, 2012


as seen at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London


Internationally renowned artists Monica Bonvinci designed three 9m tall letters forming the word RUN out of glass and stainless steel as a flagship artwork for the Park. In daylight, the letters act as a mirror for visitors and their surroundings, at night the letters glow with reflective internal LED lighting.
Bonvinci’s inspiration for the work came from musical references such as ‘Running Dry’ by Neil Young and the Velvet Underground song ‘Run Run Run’, which have also influenced her previous work. Inspired by the many uses of the Park, it was a natural choice to return to the word ‘run’ for this permanent work.

Top
Drill 4 Chastity
2004
2-part cast, bronze and rasin,
4 1/8 x 5 7/8 x 3 ½ inch
10,5 x 15 x 9 cm
Edition of 35/XX, signed and numbered

Bottom
Tears
2011
Murano Glass / Mixed media, pedestal, glass
2 Parts (c. 8 ½ x 5 x 4 inch / 4 ½ x 3 x 3 inch)
Edition 10 + 5 AP

This is currently hanging in one of the waiting areas at Cerars Sinai in Los Angeles. I saw it when meeting a friend who was waiting for her husband to come out of surgery. I took a snap of it on my phone but it came out way too crappy to post. 

JAMES ROSENQUIST

Artwork: James Rosenquist | When a Leak, 1980
43.5” x 0” x 54”
Lithograph, Color Lithograph

This is currently hanging in one of the waiting areas at Cerars Sinai in Los Angeles. I saw it when meeting a friend who was waiting for her husband to come out of surgery. I took a snap of it on my phone but it came out way too crappy to post.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

Artwork: James Rosenquist | When a Leak, 1980
43.5” x 0” x 54”
Lithograph, Color Lithograph


From the City of Angles born and raised

10 artists I like (no order)
Gerhard Richter
Ed Ruscha
Diana Thater
Ryan McGinley
Marilyn Minter
Richard Prince
Marnie Weber
Mark Ryden
Yinka Shonibare
Gordon Matta-Clark